If you have questions, or wish to discuss an appointment, please call staff at: (414) 877-1071
  1. March/April Psychiatry Drug Alerts Update

    From Psyciatry Drug Alerts Periodicity we will be updating our blog with information about Psychiatric drugs we feel will be useful to our current and future patients. These updates are not medical advice and as always you should make sure to contact your health care professional with any concerns about your symptoms and current medications. From the July 2012 Issue Olanzapine for PTSD. In a small manufacturer-sponsored study olanzapine (Zyprexa) monotherapy was superior to placebo in patients with non-combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder. -Up to 40% of all patients with PTSD do not respond to SSRIs and SNRIs, the recommended first-line treatments. Adjunctive Low-Dose Dextromethorphan in Schizophrenia Risperidone (Risperdal) with adjunctive dextromethorphan was more effective than risperdone alone in a group of patients with schizophrenia. This and other observations from the study are consistent with the hypothesis that inflammation is the underlying mechanism of schizophrenia. -Increasing evidence suggest abnormal peripheral and CNS cytokine levels, indicative of inflammatory activation, contribute to the neuronal damage and degeneration observed in patients with schizophrenia. Metformin for Antipsychotic Side Effects in Women Treatment with metformin reversed antipsychotic-induced amenorrhea and weight gain in a placebo-controlled trial of women with first-episode schizophrenia. Lurasidone: Acute Efficacy Lurasidone received FDA approval in 2010 for treatment of schizophrenia. Although similar to other second-generation antipsychotics, it has a somewhat different receptor profile and appears to cause fewer metabolic and OT effects as well as less weight gain. The approved starting dosage is 4mg/day, and the maximum recommended dosage at approval was 80mg/day. Oxytocin: Potential Schizophrenia Treatment The neurohormone oxytocin, synthesized in the hypothalamus,acts both centrally and peripherally, as both a neurotransmitter and as a homorne. Oxytocin receptors are located in a number of brain areas relevant to schizophrenia. The oxytocin sytem interacts with other hormonal systems important in schizophrenia: estrogen, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Several studies have demonstrated variations in central or peripheral levels of oxytocin or it’s carrier protein in patients with schizophrenia. ..preclinical and clinical evidence strongly supports the potential for oxytocin to ameliorate social cognitive deficits of schizophrenia, which are poorly address in other treatments.
  2. Solving sleep problems.

    Dr. James Winston is a always reading magazines and looking for new ways to help his patients with a wide range of issues. Sleep problems and insomnia are frequent reasons people choose to see a mental health professional. Dr. Winston found an article by Michael Terman, PhD on Bottom Line Health in their January 2013 issue. Fall Asleep Faster talks about delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) can cause insomnia and a sleeping medication may not be able to help.
  3. Greendale Against Bullying-What is bullying?

    Dr Jim and Gilbert Brown American Behavioral Clinics has partnered with Greendale Against Bullying. On March 22nd they had a rally to show the movie Bully, listen to former Packer Gilbert Brown and talk about how to defeat bullying. Dr. James Winston gave a speech to the 400 people who had come to take part, here is what he said. The most common definition is a repeated oppression, psychological or physical of a less powerful person by a more powerful person or group of persons. Bullying behavior occurs in schools, sports, youth groups work places, social groups, senior centers or online activities. It takes place between people of all ages and walks of life. Bullying can be physical which can include hitting, kicking or punching someone. It may involve stealing, hiding or ruining someone’s things. Sometimes it can be threats or making someone do things he or she doesn’t want to do. Verbal bullying includes teasing, insulting or name calling. Relationship bullying may include refusal to talk with someone or spreading rumors about someone. Roughly 25% of kids experience bullying, reasons may include: a different size child, smaller or bigger than other kids their age, if a child is a minority based on color, religion, or sex, if a child has a disability that makes him walk or talk differently, if a child gets anxious or upset easily, if a child is usually alone or doesn’t have many friends, if a child shows a lack of confidence and doesn’t seem like she’ll stand up for herself. Bullying isn’t new, but our attempts to respond to it are. Today, the challenges are complicated by kids access to new technologies which include cyberbullies and Facebook thugs. Cellphones and laptops spread gossip quickly. Emotional violence in the virtual world can inflict real psychological trauma. Kids who bully are often resentful or envious. Some bullies are arrogant or narcissistic. A bully may be having problems in other parts of their life. Something may be going on in their family or they are struggling with school. A bully may feel they aren’t getting enough attention from parents or teachers. A bully may have watched their parents or older siblings get their way by being angry or pushing other people around. The bully may be spoiled by their parents and hasn’t learned about not hurting others. The bully may be exposed to lots of violence in movies, tv or video games. The reason why one kid would want to bully another kid is this. When you make someone feel bad, you gain power over them. Power makes people feel like they’re better than another person. That makes them feel really good about themselves. Power makes you stand out from the crowd and get attention from other kids. So, what should children and teens do if someone bullies them? Ignore the bully. Pretend you didn’t hear them, don’t even look at him, walk right past him if you can. Don’t cry, get angry or show you’re upset, that’s the bully’s goal. Telling someone to stop firmly “NO that’s what you think”. Asking to join the game or conversation in a friendly, confident way. Learning and finding someone else to play with. Interrupting adults and being persistent asking for help. Turn and walk away or run if you have to remove yourself from the situation. Use your awareness to notice a problem situation and move out of reach. To prevent future bullying, don’t walk alone and travel with one other person if you can. Avoid places where bullying happens, i.e. take a different route to school or leave at a different time. Sit near the bus driver on a school bus. Don’t bring expensive things to school. Avoid being alone in a locker room or bathroom. Act confident, make eye contact, and stand up straight with your head held high. Practice bullying comebacks ahead of time. Make new friends and develop interest in social or physical activities. One in 10 students drop out of school because of repeated bullying. 90% of 4th to 8th graders report being victims of bullying. Harassment and bullying have been linked to 75% of school shooting episodes. In summary, people have the right to be treated with respect and the responsibility to act respectfully towards others. My 94 year old, living World War II Sergeant, father always told me to get a good education. It’s important that each child stays focused on what’s really important, like education, and not the negative energy of their peers who may try and suppress their spirits. American Behavioral Clinics is here to help when you feel lost, alone or sad. Doctors, teachers, police officers and lawyers come to American Behavioral Clinics. You shouldn’t feel shameful to get help if you need it. We need to be partners in fighting emotional and physical abuse together.
  4. Dealing with Distress- How to Talk to Children about School Shooting

    How can you explain the tragedy that took place last week at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn.? Parents across the country are searching for words to say to their young children. As we try to understand this unthinkable violence, it is important to inform and comfort our children. sad child

    Listen and Communicate Simply

    Children look to their parents for safety. Your children, at age 3 and at age 18, trust you to ensure their safety. At this time of instability, it is your responsibility to communicate with and support your children. The first step is to talk with your children about what they have heard and what they know. Let them express their opinions and worries completely- don’t interrupt. Use age-appropriate phrases to explain what happened if they ask you. For younger kids, keep the explanation simple and avoid unnecessary details. They do not need to hear excessive details that may scare them more.

    Take Care of Yourself

    To take care of your kids better, take care of yourself. You may be so overwhelmed occasionally that your children see you cry or talk about the shooting. Be honest, telling your children that you are sad for the other families. However, make sure you handle your emotions effectively and reach out to other adults for support. By keeping up your mental health in this unstable time, you can better help your children.

    Watch for Signs of Fear or Anxiety

    It is normal for children to experience a range of emotions following a tragedy. Be aware of their behavior as changes could indicate a change in mood or presence of grief or fear. Encourage your children to put their feelings into words by journaling or talking with you.

    Keep Home a Safe Place

    Your home is a safe haven for your children, especially when things seem chaotic in their world. Help them find peace at home by scheduling favorite family activities and making yourself available. These strategies should help you prepare to help your children manage their distress and fear. Remember that your children need to be comforted by you. If you feel that you or your children are suffering extensively or you notice a lasting behavioral change in your children, consider speaking with a health professional.
  5. Tips for Enjoying the Holiday Season

    Tired Holiday Shoppers Some may call this “the most wonderful time of the year”, but we know that the holiday season can actually be some of the most stressful months of the year. The busy nature of the season can lead to depression and overwhelming stress. Take some time to prepare for the next several weeks so you can enjoy the holidays rather than simply survive.

    Pressure for Perfect Holidays

    Holidays receive special attention in the media. The holiday scenes pictured on TV set extremely high standards and put pressure on Americans to live up to extravagant standards. These ads and commercials remind us of the things we “need”. Many people also feel stress as they anticipate the gatherings with extended family members and friends. It can be difficult to imagine spending time with certain people who press our buttons or let us down.

    How do you deal with added pressure and spending more time with others?

    Turn off the TV. Spend less time watching TV to avoid the extra pressure. Reflect. Take time during the holidays to stop and reflect on the blessings you have and the many reasons you should be thankful. Start new traditions. It is a great time to pick new traditions to start with family and loved ones. Traditions can be simple and often start spontaneously when you aren’t stressing over detailed plans.

    Food and Alcohol in Excess

    Many holiday celebrations center around tables of food and trays of alcoholic drinks. The added temptations can be a trigger for old habits or a trap for potential eating problems. Making a plan to handle food and alcohol temptation will help you avoid regret associated with overeating or drinking a little too much. Make a plan. Whether you stock up your pantry with healthy snacks, replace your holiday recipes with healthier versions, or add extra workouts, pick a plan that will work best for you. Set your priorities. Listing your priorities will remind you that the central focus of celebrations is spending time with others rather than tasting every treat.

    Demanding Schedule

    The holiday season often sneaks up on us and catches us unprepared. This leaves us feeling like we can’t quite catch up with the parties, baking, entertaining, shopping, and cleaning that needs to be done. Changing your attitude will help you stay relaxed even in the face of a full calendar. Stick to a budget.  Set limits for spending for each responsibility you have. Creating a budget ahead of time will help you keep things in perspective and avoid spending too much money. Reach out for help. Don’t be afraid to ask friends and family members for help. Most will be happy to help, and it may give you a chance to work together. Consider professional help. There is no shame in looking for help from professionals. If you feel consistently sad or anxious, consider talking to a doctor or mental health specialist. For more information, read a little about us or contact one of our locations.
  6. Group Therapy

    American Behavioral Clinics Group TherapyDuring group therapy, patients meet in a small group with others who may relate to their current condition. Depending on the size and nature of the groups, the setup of group therapy will vary. Typically, groups may have as many as 12 people or as little as 4 people. Groups meet under the supervision of a therapist who guides the sessions. Depending on the group’s needs, our therapists will guide the questions and discussions to bring out the most productive group session.

    Advantages of group therapy

    Group therapy paired will individual therapy produces better clinical outcomes.  Group therapy instills hope. By meeting with others who can relate, or who also face life struggles, patients see they are not alone. In a group setting, patients may share stories or offer information to encourage and support one another. The power of relating to one another and encouraging one another often enables patients to make life changes. In addition, patients may experience that their guilt, stress or pain is lessened in the company of others who can empathize or have been through similar situations. Those in the group experiencing progress or recovery will model new behaviors for other group members; those members, in turn, may be encouraged and find hope.

    Group Therapy – Building a Support System

    Group therapy builds a support system. Groups may form based on a variety of conditions. Some of our groups have formed to assist patients through relational struggles, psychological disorders, family problems, grief and loss, body issues, stress and anxiety and more. In group therapy, you can benefit from others even during sessions when you say very little.  By carefully listening to others many people find that they have important things in common with other group members. This often leads to learning more about yourself.  Group members may also bring up issues that will strike a chord that you may not have been aware of in your own life. An important benefit of group therapy is the opportunity to receive feedback from other group members in a supportive environment. Group therapy provides a safe place to learn more about yourself and others. Current Specialized Groups At American Behavioral Clinics
    • Adolescent Group
    • Bipolar Disorder Group
    • Fibromyalgia Group
    • Substance Abuse Relapse Prevention Group

    Ready to take the first step? Call (414) 281-1677 to schedule an appointment with a therapist.

  7. American Behavioral Clinics Pharmacy Services Opening November 26, 2012!

    At American Behavioral Clinics, SC, we are continue to listen to our patients needs and provide innovative services to the Milwaukee community. That’s why we have partnered with Genoa Healthcare to provide a full service pharmacy at the American Behavioral Clinics Bluemound Clinic across from the Milwaukee County Zoo. This is a full service pharmacy that is dedicated to serving all the pharmaceutical needs of all American Behavioral Clinics patients and locations. Our Genoa pharmacy is able to fulfill all of American Behavioral Clinics patients’ medication needs on-site to ensure that they’re provided with the best possible behavioral health services around.American Behavioral Clinics Pharmacy   Our Pharmacy Provides These Services:
    • Convenient, on-site fulfillment
    • Expert consultation
    • Prior authorization assistance
    • After hour on-call service
    • Rx Delivery via mail (or courier coming soon)
    • Prescription transfers
    • Refill call program
    • Refill reminder calls
    • Refill delivery service
    We are very excited to Partner with Genoa HealthCare to provide a full service pharmacy for our patients.

    Opening November 26th, 2012

    Hours and Contact Information: Mon-Thurs 8:30-5:30, Fri 8:30-3 (Closed from 12:30-1 for lunch) Phone: (414) 244-9844 Fax: (414) 877-1104

    American Behavioral Clinics - Waiting Room

  8. The Doctor-Patient Relationship

    The Doctor-Patient Relationship

    A successful doctor-patient relationship starts with good communication and a partnership where both work toward the best outcome. With preparation, you can become an active partner in your health, making sure that you leave each appointment well informed and satisfied with the care received. Below are some tips you can use to prepare and participate fully during each doctor’s appointment. These research-based suggestions also apply to other healthcare professionals, including counselors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare providers.

    Before the Visit

    Gather your information and identify key goals for your visit. It may help to make lists that cover important details: your goals for the visit, your symptoms and current medications.

    Make Lists

    Your Goals
    Are you going to the doctor to solve a problem? If so, be prepared to explain that to your physician. If you’re trying to make sure you’re up to date on screenings, immunizations or other health preventative procedures, be sure to outline those concerns. You’ll want to clearly convey this to the receptionist when making the appointment so that he/she can recommend more appointment time, if needed.
    Your Symptoms
    When describing your symptoms, try to anticipate the types of questions a doctor might ask to better prepare. For example, below are questions a doctor might ask:
    • How would you describe the symptom?
    • When did you start to feel this?
    • How long does it last?
    • What seems to bring it on?
    • Have there been any changes in your life that might have something to do with your symptom?
    • What have you tried to do, and has it helped?
    • Has anyone else in your family experienced this problem?
    For recurrent symptoms, you may want to consider keeping a journal noting to record the frequency of the condition, your diet and other factors occurring that might be affecting you.

    Don’t Be Afraid to Discuss Sensitive Issues

    Be prepared to be absolutely honest with the doctor about your lifestyle, including mental health, diet, sexual history, alcohol intake, smoking history, supplements taken, and other care received. Although it may be awkward at first, just remember that the doctor is collecting all of the information needed to help you become healthier. By discussing difficult issues, you’ll learn more about your health and your doctor will obtain the information he or she needs to help recommend the best treatment. If you feel you can’t talk with your doctor or your doctor doesn’t take your concerns seriously, don’t be afraid to seek out another one.

    Your Medications

    Make a list of all the medications you take. Your doctor may even ask you to bring them with you. Be sure to list all your prescription drugs. Write down any over-the-counter medicines, herbs, or supplements you take. Write down medicines you’ve stopped taking and the reason you or your doctor stopped them. For each drug, note:
    • The name of the drug
    • How often you take it
    • When you take the drug
    • The strength of the drug
    • What the drug is for
    • The last time you took it

    During the Visit

    Start the conversation by asking your doctor when the best time would be to discuss your concerns and indicate that you have prepared a list of symptoms and goals you’d like to review with him/her. This will enable your doctor to determine how much time he or she will need to spend on each issue and whether a separate appointment is needed to discuss all of your concerns. During the visit, it’s also important to ask questions until you feel you completely understand the information and terms your doctor is discussing. Some questions you might consider asking are: When tests, treatments, or other procedures are recommended:
    • What happens during this procedure and why is it necessary?
    • How long will it last?
    • Are there risks with this procedure?
    • How much will it cost and will my insurance cover it?
    • Are there any other treatment options available?
    When a diagnosis is made:
    • How is this condition treated or managed and how long will it last?
    • What long-term effects will the condition/illness/diagnosis have on me?
    When medications are prescribed:
    • When should I take this medicine and should it be taken with food or milk?
    • What potential side effects could there be?
    • Will it interact with other medications?
    • What if I miss a dose?
    • Is there a less-expensive, generic brand of the same drug available?
    When discussing your concerns, it may be helpful to repeat back what you heard and ask, “Is that correct?” This will help establish that you are correctly interpreting information and will clarify any confusion you might have with terms or instructions.

    Follow Up Appointments

    Note that chronic conditions should be managed in doctor visits over the length of the condition. It is important to follow up as instructed. In other circumstances, you will need to follow up in a way agreed upon by both you and your doctor. Remember, you have a right and a responsibility to ask as many questions as needed to make sure you understand your condition and treatment.

    Write Down Instructions

    Be sure to ask the doctor to write down any instructions concerning medication or treatment. Also, ask for materials about your condition, which can help further educate you about your treatment. It’s also a good practice for you to write down details during your visit. Many times, it is very helpful to bring family members, care-givers, and/or other advocates to the actual appointment.

    After the Visit

    Be consistent in following the doctor’s orders and take steps to maintain good health.
    • Fill your prescriptions consistently — Make sure you use your pharmacist as a resource. The pharmacist can clarify your doctor’s instructions and may offer additional information. Don’t be afraid to ask about your medication.
    • Take drugs as directed — For your medications to work, you should take them at the same time every day. Make it a habit.
    • Exercise — You’ve got to exercise to keep your body healthy. When you exercise you will:
      • Help your heart pump better
      • Get more energy
      • Look and feel your best
      • Reduce stress
      • Increase self-esteem
      Be sure to discuss with your doctor the appropriate fitness program for you before you get started.
    • Eat healthy — If you don’t have dietary restrictions, you don’t have to give up fried chicken or ice cream completely. Just be smart about how often and how much you eat. Try using the “80/20” rule. Eat healthy foods 80 percent of the time. Then you can indulge – in moderation – 20 percent of the time.
    Most importantly be sure to discuss your daily diet with your doctor to make sure you understand the foods that you may need to avoid, due to existing conditions.   Source: LifeSynch. a Humana company
  9. Ten Reasons to Include Family Therapy

    Ten Reasons to Include Family Therapy in the Initial Treatment of Children and Adolescents

    Practitioners use many different strategies to engage parents early in the treatment process because: 1. The parent/guardian has an important story to share about the child and his/her target behaviors. 2. The parent/guardian’s perspective about the child’s behavior affects the child’s perception about his/her behavior. 3. Family strengths affect the child’s strengths and resources for change. 4. Family limitations also limit the child’s capacity for functioning and growth. 5. Important cultural considerations may only be available through contact with the parent/guardian. 6. Commitment of the parent/guardian to changing the child’s target behaviors affects the degree of change the child will make. 7. The parent/guardian can tell the practitioner how much progress the child has made and whether target behaviors are improving. 8. The parent/guardian’s behavior can accelerate positive changes in the child through active participation in treatment. 9. The parent/guardian may sabotage treatment gains unwittingly without input from the provider. 10. The parent/guardian can reinforce gains made in treatment with input from the practitioner. Source: LifeSynch. a Humana company
  10. College Drinking

    College Drinking American Behavioral ClinicsCollege Drinking: Changing the Culture, created by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). CollegeDrinkingPrevention.gov is your one-stop resource for comprehensive research-based information on issues related to alcohol abuse and binge drinking among college students.

    Click here to read more…

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