If you have questions, or wish to discuss an appointment, please call staff at: (414) 877-1071
  1. Tips for Enjoying the Holiday Season

    Tired Holiday Shoppers Some may call this “the most wonderful time of the year”, but we know that the holiday season can actually be some of the most stressful months of the year. The busy nature of the season can lead to depression and overwhelming stress. Take some time to prepare for the next several weeks so you can enjoy the holidays rather than simply survive.

    Pressure for Perfect Holidays

    Holidays receive special attention in the media. The holiday scenes pictured on TV set extremely high standards and put pressure on Americans to live up to extravagant standards. These ads and commercials remind us of the things we “need”. Many people also feel stress as they anticipate the gatherings with extended family members and friends. It can be difficult to imagine spending time with certain people who press our buttons or let us down.

    How do you deal with added pressure and spending more time with others?

    Turn off the TV. Spend less time watching TV to avoid the extra pressure. Reflect. Take time during the holidays to stop and reflect on the blessings you have and the many reasons you should be thankful. Start new traditions. It is a great time to pick new traditions to start with family and loved ones. Traditions can be simple and often start spontaneously when you aren’t stressing over detailed plans.

    Food and Alcohol in Excess

    Many holiday celebrations center around tables of food and trays of alcoholic drinks. The added temptations can be a trigger for old habits or a trap for potential eating problems. Making a plan to handle food and alcohol temptation will help you avoid regret associated with overeating or drinking a little too much. Make a plan. Whether you stock up your pantry with healthy snacks, replace your holiday recipes with healthier versions, or add extra workouts, pick a plan that will work best for you. Set your priorities. Listing your priorities will remind you that the central focus of celebrations is spending time with others rather than tasting every treat.

    Demanding Schedule

    The holiday season often sneaks up on us and catches us unprepared. This leaves us feeling like we can’t quite catch up with the parties, baking, entertaining, shopping, and cleaning that needs to be done. Changing your attitude will help you stay relaxed even in the face of a full calendar. Stick to a budget.  Set limits for spending for each responsibility you have. Creating a budget ahead of time will help you keep things in perspective and avoid spending too much money. Reach out for help. Don’t be afraid to ask friends and family members for help. Most will be happy to help, and it may give you a chance to work together. Consider professional help. There is no shame in looking for help from professionals. If you feel consistently sad or anxious, consider talking to a doctor or mental health specialist. For more information, read a little about us or contact one of our locations.
  2. Group Therapy

    American Behavioral Clinics Group TherapyDuring group therapy, patients meet in a small group with others who may relate to their current condition. Depending on the size and nature of the groups, the setup of group therapy will vary. Typically, groups may have as many as 12 people or as little as 4 people. Groups meet under the supervision of a therapist who guides the sessions. Depending on the group’s needs, our therapists will guide the questions and discussions to bring out the most productive group session.

    Advantages of group therapy

    Group therapy paired will individual therapy produces better clinical outcomes.  Group therapy instills hope. By meeting with others who can relate, or who also face life struggles, patients see they are not alone. In a group setting, patients may share stories or offer information to encourage and support one another. The power of relating to one another and encouraging one another often enables patients to make life changes. In addition, patients may experience that their guilt, stress or pain is lessened in the company of others who can empathize or have been through similar situations. Those in the group experiencing progress or recovery will model new behaviors for other group members; those members, in turn, may be encouraged and find hope.

    Group Therapy – Building a Support System

    Group therapy builds a support system. Groups may form based on a variety of conditions. Some of our groups have formed to assist patients through relational struggles, psychological disorders, family problems, grief and loss, body issues, stress and anxiety and more. In group therapy, you can benefit from others even during sessions when you say very little.  By carefully listening to others many people find that they have important things in common with other group members. This often leads to learning more about yourself.  Group members may also bring up issues that will strike a chord that you may not have been aware of in your own life. An important benefit of group therapy is the opportunity to receive feedback from other group members in a supportive environment. Group therapy provides a safe place to learn more about yourself and others. Current Specialized Groups At American Behavioral Clinics
    • Adolescent Group
    • Bipolar Disorder Group
    • Fibromyalgia Group
    • Substance Abuse Relapse Prevention Group

    Ready to take the first step? Call (414) 281-1677 to schedule an appointment with a therapist.

  3. Ten Reasons to Include Family Therapy

    Ten Reasons to Include Family Therapy in the Initial Treatment of Children and Adolescents

    Practitioners use many different strategies to engage parents early in the treatment process because: 1. The parent/guardian has an important story to share about the child and his/her target behaviors. 2. The parent/guardian’s perspective about the child’s behavior affects the child’s perception about his/her behavior. 3. Family strengths affect the child’s strengths and resources for change. 4. Family limitations also limit the child’s capacity for functioning and growth. 5. Important cultural considerations may only be available through contact with the parent/guardian. 6. Commitment of the parent/guardian to changing the child’s target behaviors affects the degree of change the child will make. 7. The parent/guardian can tell the practitioner how much progress the child has made and whether target behaviors are improving. 8. The parent/guardian’s behavior can accelerate positive changes in the child through active participation in treatment. 9. The parent/guardian may sabotage treatment gains unwittingly without input from the provider. 10. The parent/guardian can reinforce gains made in treatment with input from the practitioner. Source: LifeSynch. a Humana company

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