If you have questions, or wish to discuss an appointment, please call staff at: (414) 877-1071
  1. Group Therapy

    American Behavioral Clinics Group TherapyDuring group therapy, patients meet in a small group with others who may relate to their current condition. Depending on the size and nature of the groups, the setup of group therapy will vary. Typically, groups may have as many as 12 people or as little as 4 people. Groups meet under the supervision of a therapist who guides the sessions. Depending on the group’s needs, our therapists will guide the questions and discussions to bring out the most productive group session.

    Advantages of group therapy

    Group therapy paired will individual therapy produces better clinical outcomes.  Group therapy instills hope. By meeting with others who can relate, or who also face life struggles, patients see they are not alone. In a group setting, patients may share stories or offer information to encourage and support one another. The power of relating to one another and encouraging one another often enables patients to make life changes. In addition, patients may experience that their guilt, stress or pain is lessened in the company of others who can empathize or have been through similar situations. Those in the group experiencing progress or recovery will model new behaviors for other group members; those members, in turn, may be encouraged and find hope.

    Group Therapy – Building a Support System

    Group therapy builds a support system. Groups may form based on a variety of conditions. Some of our groups have formed to assist patients through relational struggles, psychological disorders, family problems, grief and loss, body issues, stress and anxiety and more. In group therapy, you can benefit from others even during sessions when you say very little.  By carefully listening to others many people find that they have important things in common with other group members. This often leads to learning more about yourself.  Group members may also bring up issues that will strike a chord that you may not have been aware of in your own life. An important benefit of group therapy is the opportunity to receive feedback from other group members in a supportive environment. Group therapy provides a safe place to learn more about yourself and others. Current Specialized Groups At American Behavioral Clinics
    • Adolescent Group
    • Bipolar Disorder Group
    • Fibromyalgia Group
    • Substance Abuse Relapse Prevention Group

    Ready to take the first step? Call (414) 281-1677 to schedule an appointment with a therapist.

  2. The Doctor-Patient Relationship

    The Doctor-Patient Relationship

    A successful doctor-patient relationship starts with good communication and a partnership where both work toward the best outcome. With preparation, you can become an active partner in your health, making sure that you leave each appointment well informed and satisfied with the care received. Below are some tips you can use to prepare and participate fully during each doctor’s appointment. These research-based suggestions also apply to other healthcare professionals, including counselors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare providers.

    Before the Visit

    Gather your information and identify key goals for your visit. It may help to make lists that cover important details: your goals for the visit, your symptoms and current medications.

    Make Lists

    Your Goals
    Are you going to the doctor to solve a problem? If so, be prepared to explain that to your physician. If you’re trying to make sure you’re up to date on screenings, immunizations or other health preventative procedures, be sure to outline those concerns. You’ll want to clearly convey this to the receptionist when making the appointment so that he/she can recommend more appointment time, if needed.
    Your Symptoms
    When describing your symptoms, try to anticipate the types of questions a doctor might ask to better prepare. For example, below are questions a doctor might ask:
    • How would you describe the symptom?
    • When did you start to feel this?
    • How long does it last?
    • What seems to bring it on?
    • Have there been any changes in your life that might have something to do with your symptom?
    • What have you tried to do, and has it helped?
    • Has anyone else in your family experienced this problem?
    For recurrent symptoms, you may want to consider keeping a journal noting to record the frequency of the condition, your diet and other factors occurring that might be affecting you.

    Don’t Be Afraid to Discuss Sensitive Issues

    Be prepared to be absolutely honest with the doctor about your lifestyle, including mental health, diet, sexual history, alcohol intake, smoking history, supplements taken, and other care received. Although it may be awkward at first, just remember that the doctor is collecting all of the information needed to help you become healthier. By discussing difficult issues, you’ll learn more about your health and your doctor will obtain the information he or she needs to help recommend the best treatment. If you feel you can’t talk with your doctor or your doctor doesn’t take your concerns seriously, don’t be afraid to seek out another one.

    Your Medications

    Make a list of all the medications you take. Your doctor may even ask you to bring them with you. Be sure to list all your prescription drugs. Write down any over-the-counter medicines, herbs, or supplements you take. Write down medicines you’ve stopped taking and the reason you or your doctor stopped them. For each drug, note:
    • The name of the drug
    • How often you take it
    • When you take the drug
    • The strength of the drug
    • What the drug is for
    • The last time you took it

    During the Visit

    Start the conversation by asking your doctor when the best time would be to discuss your concerns and indicate that you have prepared a list of symptoms and goals you’d like to review with him/her. This will enable your doctor to determine how much time he or she will need to spend on each issue and whether a separate appointment is needed to discuss all of your concerns. During the visit, it’s also important to ask questions until you feel you completely understand the information and terms your doctor is discussing. Some questions you might consider asking are: When tests, treatments, or other procedures are recommended:
    • What happens during this procedure and why is it necessary?
    • How long will it last?
    • Are there risks with this procedure?
    • How much will it cost and will my insurance cover it?
    • Are there any other treatment options available?
    When a diagnosis is made:
    • How is this condition treated or managed and how long will it last?
    • What long-term effects will the condition/illness/diagnosis have on me?
    When medications are prescribed:
    • When should I take this medicine and should it be taken with food or milk?
    • What potential side effects could there be?
    • Will it interact with other medications?
    • What if I miss a dose?
    • Is there a less-expensive, generic brand of the same drug available?
    When discussing your concerns, it may be helpful to repeat back what you heard and ask, “Is that correct?” This will help establish that you are correctly interpreting information and will clarify any confusion you might have with terms or instructions.

    Follow Up Appointments

    Note that chronic conditions should be managed in doctor visits over the length of the condition. It is important to follow up as instructed. In other circumstances, you will need to follow up in a way agreed upon by both you and your doctor. Remember, you have a right and a responsibility to ask as many questions as needed to make sure you understand your condition and treatment.

    Write Down Instructions

    Be sure to ask the doctor to write down any instructions concerning medication or treatment. Also, ask for materials about your condition, which can help further educate you about your treatment. It’s also a good practice for you to write down details during your visit. Many times, it is very helpful to bring family members, care-givers, and/or other advocates to the actual appointment.

    After the Visit

    Be consistent in following the doctor’s orders and take steps to maintain good health.
    • Fill your prescriptions consistently — Make sure you use your pharmacist as a resource. The pharmacist can clarify your doctor’s instructions and may offer additional information. Don’t be afraid to ask about your medication.
    • Take drugs as directed — For your medications to work, you should take them at the same time every day. Make it a habit.
    • Exercise — You’ve got to exercise to keep your body healthy. When you exercise you will:
      • Help your heart pump better
      • Get more energy
      • Look and feel your best
      • Reduce stress
      • Increase self-esteem
      Be sure to discuss with your doctor the appropriate fitness program for you before you get started.
    • Eat healthy — If you don’t have dietary restrictions, you don’t have to give up fried chicken or ice cream completely. Just be smart about how often and how much you eat. Try using the “80/20” rule. Eat healthy foods 80 percent of the time. Then you can indulge – in moderation – 20 percent of the time.
    Most importantly be sure to discuss your daily diet with your doctor to make sure you understand the foods that you may need to avoid, due to existing conditions.   Source: LifeSynch. a Humana company
  3. Domestic Violence in the Workplace

    From Milwaukee’s FEI Behavioral Health – The Workforce Resilience Experts – As recent events have proven, acts of domestic violence in the workplace not only pose a threat to the victim but also potentially to co-workers and customers. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men in the United States have experienced some form of domestic violence in their lifetime. In addition, the annual cost of lost productivity in the workplace due to domestic violence totals $727.8 million. In order to create an organizational culture that promotes employee safety, managers should be trained to recognize and respond to signs of domestic violence among employees. Domestic violence includes a pattern of repeated physical or psychological behavior used to coerce, intimidate, humiliate or force another person to think, feel or behave in a manner that the batterer dictates. It includes physical abuse, sexual abuse, isolation, economic reprisals, emotional put-downs, threats and intimidation. Typically, domestic violence follows a cycle of three stages: • The tension state is where stress between partners becomes intense. The victim will often try to ease the abuser’s stress in an attempt to avoid the violence. • The explosive stage involves the actual violence. Violence can take any form and is not exclusively physical. • The honeymoon stage is the time that the abuser is extremely remorseful and committed to “never doing it again.” The victim often chooses to believe the promises. Unfortunately, the cycle of violence usually continues. Identifying that the cycle is part of your life is often the first step toward help. While the cycle is not easy to break, the violence will continue unless help is secured. When signs of domestic violence enter the workplace managers must take swift action and understand how to appropriately address changes in behavior that affects employee performance. Managers should consider the following: • Develop workplace safety response plans and provide reasonable means to assist victimized employees in developing and implementing individualized workplace safety strategies. • Incorporate a specific intimate partner violence clause in your general policies on workplace safety. Make sure your policy addresses performance issues related to victims of domestic violence, provides accountability for employees who use company property (mail, e-mail, letters, phones) to harass a family or household member, and outlines the rights of domestic violence victims as they relate to the use of company time and resources to handle domestic violence and/or resulting legal issues. • Post information on domestic violence and available resources in the work site in places where employees can obtain it without having to request it or be seen removing it, such as employee rest rooms, lounge areas, as inserts in employee benefits packages and/or as part of new employee orientation. • Stay clear of common pitfalls, such as offering personal advice or attempting to counsel. Instead, employees should be referred to their EAP or a domestic violence help hotline. Read more from Milwaukee’s FEI Behavioral Health

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